Posted by: Philip Carr-Gomm | January 9, 2008

John O’Donohue

 Fionntulach (Fiona Davidson) just sent this news about John ODonohue:

“Today I heard that John O’Donohue died on January 3rd, 2008 peacefully in his sleep. He was 53. Few people realise that, as well as his busy work as a writer and speaker, O’Donohue was also a committed ecological activist.. and did much work in that field,  particularly to protect the Burren in the West of Ireland. His book “Anam Cara” was a first introduction to Celtic Spirituality for many people..  I have heard so many say what a  joy they  felt upon reading the book and how they just could not put it down. Until his book, the concept of the Anam Chara was unknown out with fairly well-informed Celtic circles. Now we see the term almost everywhere… In his books, O’Donohue speaks to the deepest calling of our soul: the longing to belong – “Belonging is a circle that embraces everything; if we reject it, we damage our nature. The word ‘belonging’ holds together the two fundamental aspects of life: Being and Longing, the longing of our Being and the being of our Longing.’  Celtic Spirituality has lost a sensitive writer… and a soul-friend to many. May his passing into Tir Nan Og be easy and may he nourish that place as much as he has this world that he loved so much…

Le graidh, Fionntulach


Responses

  1. John O’Donohue changed the way I read, thought , wrote and used words.
    In the Ringing Cedars of Russia series, Anastasia talks about combinations of letters and words that can truly effect our state. She uses them on purpose, consciously. John O’D did the same, whether he knew it or not. I LOVE his use of words, and knowing of the ‘soul friend’….. that friend is inside as well as outside. Dear dear young man that he was when he made his transition, his ancient knowing has been a wake up song to many of us. Bless him.

  2. Reading “Anam Cara” changed my heart. How beautiful was every word. When I had the opportunity to attend a local workshop to listen to this amazing soul, I couldn’t believe my good fortune. For my whole life, I will remember his presence, his obvious dedication to cause, the depth of conscience which lead to his leaving the priesthood, his brilliant mind, his joy in laughter, and above all his intimacy with the clay and spirit that unites all of us. I can’t believe he has left this earth so soon. I can’t get beyond losing him right now. I want him to still be here. But I am consoled in the knowledge that he is at rest and that we can still find deep, abiding comfort from his gifts to us.


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